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> Midichlorians are no big deal
Leiafan
post Mar 14 2010, 06:03 AM
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A friend of mine wrote the following essay on her blog, SWPAS (Star Wars Prequel Appreciation Society), in response to some PT-hater exhuming the carcass of the long-dead "midichlorians reduce the Force to a chemical reaction!" horse so as to beat it some more, with the usual Greek chorus of bashers nodding along in approval and Darth Media rushing to the scene to publicize it.

QUOTE
Here’s why those [midichlorians] shouldn’t trouble anyone:

Years after they were introduced as a plot device in TPM, some SW fans just cannot get over the little unseen critters called “midichlorians.” They can easily accept planets with a single environment and always have breathable air or ships that can go kaboom in huge balls of fire in space, but the concept of midichlorians sets them off into utter fanboy rage. They say it changed the Force and that ruins everything! I’ll never understand why some things, small things that don’t matter to 99% of most moviegoers, get under the skin of these fans.

Oh sure, some of them rethought their position after ROTS raised the possibility that the midichlorians were manipulated by the Sith to create Anakin. Well, then, that’s cool!

But others still hold on to their resentment all of these years, claiming the midis are symptomatic of what has become of SW since the prequels. (And yet they remain to try and ruin things for the rest of us.) The latest salvo opened when two of the executive producers on "Lost" tried to use fanboy (and their own) anti-midichlorian attitudes to avoid having to explain one of the central themes of the show. A writer on the reliably anti-PT i09 site responded with an essay that tried to say this was a lame excuse on the part of these guys but really spent the entire time beating up on the concept of midichlorians. Which you know is always an open invitation to come in and beat up on everything about the PT.

Well, here’s my take on why the i09 guy and the critics are way off.

1. The midichlorians do not change the Force

The Force is what it has always been. It’s still that mystical energy field that lets Jedi and Sith characters do all kinds of cool stuff mere mortals cannot. Not a thing that we’ve learned in TPM changes that. At least not on paper. As with a lot of other things about SW, fans had almost two decades to form in their own minds what concepts like the Force are supposed to be, and lo and behold, when new information is introduced, it blows that concept out of the water. Me, I had no concept at all. I didn’t care if the Force came from God or from carne asada burritos. It’s just what’s in the story. So when the midichlorians were introduced, I thought, “Well, that’s interesting.”

2. The midichlorians are not the Force

They’re not meant to explain the Force itself nor are they meant to be the Force itself, but to explain why if the Force flows through all living things, some have abilities with it that others do not. It’s also meant to explain Anakin’s potential and why he (along with his progeny) are so important to the story. As one fan put it, otherwise the Emperor may as well have spent his time worrying about Han Solo or Wedge’s growing skills as a pilot.

3. Midichlorians are not really scientific

A common complaint about the midis is that they introduce “science” into what is often perceived as a quasi-religious concept. After all, it’s the physical presence of living organisms in the body that act as intermediaries with the Force. Isn’t that like saying you have to have the right blood type to be touched by the Holy Spirit? Huh? Huh??

First of all, so what? Again this goes to fan concepts about SW that run headlong into what actually is in the movies. George Lucas never said, “The Force is just like the Holy Spirit and everything you learned in catchecism.” What he has said is that the midichlorians are meant to be a metaphor, part of a general theme about symbiosis that appears in TPM and throughout the prequel films. Much of the symbiosis in the films is spiritual and emotional in nature. Worth a whole ‘nuther essay, in fact.

4. The midichlorians were not unnecessary, clumsy retcon

There were a lot of different ways Lucas could have approached his story and he just happened to have chosen this one. Again, it was about the themes he wanted to explore in this trilogy. The midichlorian thing was a device. What would have been better? Anakin identified as the Chosen One because of a birthmark on his butt? Because he’s just better at being a Jedi than anyone else, without any explanation as to why? A radioactive spider bit him? The solar flares from Tatooine’s twin suns? Anakin was a symbiont with the Force, so his actions have a much greater effect than had it been any other character.


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Madison_rogue
post Mar 15 2010, 05:04 AM
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Funny, this is the first time I heard of the article and uproar about midichlorians.

But now that you bring it to my attention, I googled a few articles on the particular midichlorian comments referenced in your quoted blog entry (since they weren't conveniently referenced as they should be when presenting an argument), and found the interview with Carlton Cuse & Damon Lindelof.

Primarily I found an interview with Maureen Ryan from the Chicago Tribune.

Tribune Interview: Part I
Tribune Interview: Part II
Tribune Interview: Part III

And it's a really great series of articles that gets inside the heads of the producers and lays out feelings they have on plot developments they believe will work and do not work with the show's fan base. In all honesty they're just as critical of The Soprano's and Battlestar Galactica's series finales, and are trying to incorporate the lessons learned from these particular shows and incorporate them into the last season of Lost. I think it's admirable that they are taking those aspects into consideration.

E! Online interview with Damon Lendelof

This article's reference, however seems a lot more like bashing. Yet, it criticizes midichlorians, not the entire Prequel Trilogy. Honestly I understand why some fans don't like midichlorians, and truthfully I wasn't initially too keen on the idea either. Yet I, like many other fans who are not as vocal as it's detractors, grew to accept it.

You either accept GL's vision or you reject it. You really can't go anywhere inbetween. Midichlorians are a part of that (OT original releases excluded for Han Shot first fandom...sorry...another topic), therefore it is canon and must be accepted. Prior to it's introduction as a plot device, the Force is accessible to anyone who has a desire to follow the ways of the Force. After TPM, this really isn't the case. Access to the Force is restricted to those who have a high concentration of symbiotic bacteria in their bodies.

Midichlorians don't change the nature of the Force, yet they drastically change who is allowed access to it. That's a big deal, and honestly I can see why there are fans who reject, claim retcon (even though it's not), and downplay TPM because of them. Midichlorians by their nature challenge preconceptions drawn from the OT by essentially making the Jedi a class of privilege and set apart from the normal folk of the GFFA. Yet this is as commonplace in our world as it is now in Lucas' saga, and that is a jagged pill to swallow for fans. I can definitely understand why some people hate midichlorians.

QUOTE
Oh sure, some of them rethought their position after ROTS raised the possibility that the midichlorians were manipulated by the Sith to create Anakin. Well, then, that’s cool!

^And this!?

The thought makes me shudder. Absolutely NOT.

*gags*


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Zideric
post Mar 17 2010, 08:52 PM
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I never really payed attention to midichlorians, but now I think of it...

I've always seen the force as some power that is everywhere, and flows through all things, living and dead. I thought everyone could learn to manipulate the force. But now midichlorians are introduced, that would mean not everybody would be able to use the force. I don't like that idea. I liked the idea of the force in the original trilogy, without midichlorians.

Then again, I agree GL had to come up with something like midichlorians to write the story. I don't really like the idea of midichlorians, but I can't think of something better either.


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Madison_rogue
post Mar 18 2010, 10:57 PM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 17 2010, 02:52 PM) *
I never really payed attention to midichlorians, but now I think of it...

I've always seen the force as some power that is everywhere, and flows through all things, living and dead. I thought everyone could learn to manipulate the force. But now midichlorians are introduced, that would mean not everybody would be able to use the force. I don't like that idea. I liked the idea of the force in the original trilogy, without midichlorians.

Then again, I agree GL had to come up with something like midichlorians to write the story. I don't really like the idea of midichlorians, but I can't think of something better either.


The problem is the idea of the Force presented in the OT, was always based within the context set forth in The Phantom Menace in regards to midichlorians. After reading a few articles, I understand that GL intended to use midichlorians as a plot device back as far back as 1977 when EU products were in their development (primarily the novel Splinter of the Mind's Eye).

As a plot device midichlorians do tie up loose ends in the storyline. Solo's and Tarkin's comments come to mind. Solo: "Kid, I've flown from one side of this galaxy to the other, and I've seen a lot of strange stuff, but I've never seen *anything* to make me believe that there's one all-powerful Force controlling everything. 'Cause no mystical energy field controls *my* destiny. It's all a lot of simple tricks and nonsense." Tarkin: "You, my friend, are all that's left of their religion."

IMO, these comments are indicative of a mindset that doesn't include the Force in the grand scheme of things for these two characters. More than likely, this is due to the fact that they've never actually "felt" the Force because it's impossible for them to do so. So the question begs, why do some feel the Force while others do not? Midichlorians is an entirely plausible and acceptable explanation.

The fact that some fans don't like it, is another story entirely because accessibility to the Force is an issue. They just didn't know about it until TPM, so it does challenge preconceptions drawn from the OT.


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Zideric
post Mar 18 2010, 11:10 PM
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QUOTE (Madison_rogue @ Mar 18 2010, 10:57 PM) *
IMO, these comments are indicative of a mindset that doesn't include the Force in the grand scheme of things for these two characters. More than likely, this is due to the fact that they've never actually "felt" the Force because it's impossible for them to do so. So the question begs, why do some feel the Force while others do not? Midichlorians is an entirely plausible and acceptable explanation.

The fact that some fans don't like it, is another story entirely because accessibility to the Force is an issue. They just didn't know about it until TPM, so it does challenge preconceptions drawn from the OT.


Ok, it might have been that George Lucas made up the idea of midichlorians a long time ago, but theres still a difference between the force in the original trilogy and the prequels. He might have had the idea of midichlorians back then, but he didn't tell it. If you don't tell the entire story, you have a different story.

And I thought the explanation for some people feel the force and some don't, is that the ones who do are trained Jedi or Sith. They have been their entire life to feel and use the force. With only information from the original trilogy, Han Solo could have learned to feel and use the force too, maybe even at that age, even if only just a little.


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Madison_rogue
post Mar 18 2010, 11:53 PM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 18 2010, 05:10 PM) *
Ok, it might have been that George Lucas made up the idea of midichlorians a long time ago, but theres still a difference between the force in the original trilogy and the prequels. He might have had the idea of midichlorians back then, but he didn't tell it. If you don't tell the entire story, you have a different story.


Honestly, what's the difference? It still operates the same. It's still an energy field that permeates all things. It doesn't loose it's mysticism. The only difference is that its manipulation is not open to just anyone. Not everyone can be a writer, artist, scientist, actor, or gold medal winning athlete. Not everyone can use the Force.

Just because midichlorians are not addressed in the OT, does not automatically mean that the Force is different from one trilogy to the next. Quite contrary, the Force operates in the exact same manner. The fact remains Lucas devised midichlorians in 1977, and provided canonical guidelines to writers to maintain continuity.

You may not like it (just like I'm not at all fond of Greedo shooting first), but that's the way it is.


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AdmiralTreyDavid
post Mar 20 2010, 07:43 AM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 18 2010, 11:10 PM) *
Ok, it might have been that George Lucas made up the idea of midichlorians a long time ago, but theres still a difference between the force in the original trilogy and the prequels. He might have had the idea of midichlorians back then, but he didn't tell it. If you don't tell the entire story, you have a different story.

And I thought the explanation for some people feel the force and some don't, is that the ones who do are trained Jedi or Sith. They have been their entire life to feel and use the force. With only information from the original trilogy, Han Solo could have learned to feel and use the force too, maybe even at that age, even if only just a little.


I think a problem with this line of thought is:

If everyone could learn to master the Force through training, wouldn't everyone train to be a Jedi?
If I knew I could be a Jedi, I'd certainly want to learn how! If this were the case, it wouldn't make sense that a Jedi Order could have existed without fringe elements and rogue teachers, or that Jedi could have ever been wiped out from the galaxy, because it would obviously be much more widespread if suddenly instead of like 0.05% of the galaxy's population being able to be strong in the Force, 100% of the population had the potential to be strong in the Force.

Midichlorians are one of the little things that don't bother me at all, really. I'm more bothered by seeing Hayden Christensen in Return of the Jedi than I am by Midichlorians.


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Zideric
post Mar 28 2010, 09:09 AM
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QUOTE (AdmiralTreyDavid @ Mar 20 2010, 08:43 AM) *
I think a problem with this line of thought is:

If everyone could learn to master the Force through training, wouldn't everyone train to be a Jedi?
If I knew I could be a Jedi, I'd certainly want to learn how! If this were the case, it wouldn't make sense that a Jedi Order could have existed without fringe elements and rogue teachers, or that Jedi could have ever been wiped out from the galaxy, because it would obviously be much more widespread if suddenly instead of like 0.05% of the galaxy's population being able to be strong in the Force, 100% of the population had the potential to be strong in the Force.

Midichlorians are one of the little things that don't bother me at all, really. I'm more bothered by seeing Hayden Christensen in Return of the Jedi than I am by Midichlorians.


I don't see the real problem. If everyone could basically learn how to use the force, not everyone would get to. There weren't that many jedi in the prequels. You have to be lucky enough to meet a jedi who has the time, and is in the right position, to take you to the jedi temple to be trained. If you could become a jedi, but there's no opportunity, you simply can't become a jedi. I guess there are a lot of planets with no jedi on them, and the culture won't let anyone become a jedi either.

And of course, you have to be trained from a very young age. So a lot of people don't know they could have become a jedi, and they are too late.

This is what I think of the force, with only information from the original trilogy.


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Madison_rogue
post Mar 28 2010, 03:05 PM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 28 2010, 03:09 AM) *
I don't see the real problem. If everyone could basically learn how to use the force, not everyone would get to. There weren't that many jedi in the prequels. You have to be lucky enough to meet a jedi who has the time, and is in the right position, to take you to the jedi temple to be trained. If you could become a jedi, but there's no opportunity, you simply can't become a jedi. I guess there are a lot of planets with no jedi on them, and the culture won't let anyone become a jedi either.

And of course, you have to be trained from a very young age. So a lot of people don't know they could have become a jedi, and they are too late.

This is what I think of the force, with only information from the original trilogy.


You really have to do the math to properly understand exactly what you're talking about.

QUOTE (star wars wiki)
There were approximately 400 billion stars and around half of these had planets that could support life. Ten percent of those planets developed life, while sentient life developed in 1/1,000 of those (about 20 million). The galaxy was populated by approximately 100 quadrillion different life forms.


100 quadrillion life forms, and 20 million planets with sentient life that existed within the GFFA. Let's say that for each given planet, one person is allowed into the Jedi Order. That's a membership of 20,000,000 in the organization, and doesn't reflect the Order's membership at the time of the Clone Wars. If I recall correctly, The Republic consisted of approximately 1 million planetary members. Even if this is taken into consideration, and each world had one representative in the Order, it would be significantly larger than it is at the onset of the Clone Wars.

So let's say that the Jedi's membership is approximately 10,000 at the onset of the Clone Wars in 22 BBY (a respectable and highly reasonable number). That's approximately 1 member for every 1,000 planets, and one member per every 10,000,000,000,000 sentient beings alive within the Galaxy. Yes, that's one member per 10 trillion sentient beings.

If you do not take midi-chlorians into consideration within the grand scheme of things, don't you think that number would be considerably higher? I would think as much. I bet I could find 10,000 people on planet Earth alone that would want to be a Jedi.


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Zideric
post Mar 28 2010, 11:45 PM
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I'm still not really convinced.

QUOTE (Madison_rogue @ Mar 28 2010, 04:05 PM) *
100 quadrillion life forms, and 20 million planets with sentient life that existed within the GFFA. Let's say that for each given planet, one person is allowed into the Jedi Order. That's a membership of 20,000,000 in the organization, and doesn't reflect the Order's membership at the time of the Clone Wars. If I recall correctly, The Republic consisted of approximately 1 million planetary members. Even if this is taken into consideration, and each world had one representative in the Order, it would be significantly larger than it is at the onset of the Clone Wars.


I don't think every planet can be reached by Jedi or civilization at all. There might be that many planets, but it can't be that all of them have just a little human-like life forms, and it can't be that all of those planets are in contact with other planets. There must be a lot of planets like Dagobah, or Tatooine, with life forms such as giant fishes, hutts, sarlaccs...

So sure there are a lot of life forms, but not all of them are physically able to become jedi. And even if they are physically able, they might not be civilized, like ewoks or tusken raiders.

Besides, the only place I know where you can be accepted and trained to become a Jedi is the Jedi temple on Coruscant. I guess that's a big factor too. It makes it much harder for life forms all over the galaxy to become jedi if they all have to go to Coruscant.


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Madison_rogue
post Mar 29 2010, 12:39 AM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 28 2010, 05:45 PM) *
I'm still not really convinced.



I don't think every planet can be reached by Jedi or civilization at all. There might be that many planets, but it can't be that all of them have just a little human-like life forms, and it can't be that all of those planets are in contact with other planets. There must be a lot of planets like Dagobah, or Tatooine, with life forms such as giant fishes, hutts, sarlaccs...

So sure there are a lot of life forms, but not all of them are physically able to become jedi. And even if they are physically able, they might not be civilized, like ewoks or tusken raiders.


That's sentient life. Life considered high enough to function with language and technology. Let me emphasize again, 20 million planets with sentient life. 1 million of those planets were members of the Galactic Republic, meaning their respective civilizations had hyperdrive capability and highly evolved social skills. Even if half of its membership gave up one person per planet it would still be an organization with 500,000 members.

QUOTE
Besides, the only place I know where you can be accepted and trained to become a Jedi is the Jedi temple on Coruscant. I guess that's a big factor too. It makes it much harder for life forms all over the galaxy to become jedi if they all have to go to Coruscant.


With the practically unlimited resources the Jedi possessed as the law enforcement wing of the Senate, I find it highly improbable that they would ignore a candidate who showed the initial potential to wield the Force. Transportation to and from Coruscant would not be an issue at all.

QUOTE (star wars wiki midi-chlorian)
Midi-chlorians could be detected through a blood test by measuring their concentration in a being's red blood cells,[7] though such tests were not perfect and were prone to fault.[1] Midi-chlorian tests were part of a standard medical check-up, recorded in a blood analysis.[6] From at least 1,000 BBY to 19 BBY, blood tests for midi-chlorians were the primary way by which the Jedi Order found Force-sensitive children.[8]


(emphasis added)

So, it was a part of every child's medical tests in The Republic. That's 1 million planets with a medical program to screen for potential members to the order. Given a 10,000 strong organization at the beginning of the Clone Wars, I believe the statistics present a valid argument for midi-chlorians.

To give a RL example, 53,000 New Zealanders identified themselves as "Jedi" in the 2001 census. Jedi census phenomenon-Wikipedia

So even if just one planet out of a million went cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs over the desire to join the Order, there would still be too many members if even just a fraction of those that desired to join actually gained a place in the Jedi.


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Zideric
post Mar 29 2010, 10:03 AM
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Ok, midichlorians is a good explanation for the amount of jedi in the prequels.

But I still think the force in the OT is different from the force in the PT. There were almost no jedi left in the OT, because the 'religion' had been forgotten. Nobody sais anything about midichlorians, and nobody feels anything. It's like nobody has midichlorians at all in the OT.

I still like the OT 'without' midichlorians better.


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Leiafan
post Mar 30 2010, 09:43 AM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 18 2010, 11:10 PM) *
Ok, it might have been that George Lucas made up the idea of midichlorians a long time ago, but theres still a difference between the force in the original trilogy and the prequels. He might have had the idea of midichlorians back then, but he didn't tell it. If you don't tell the entire story, you have a different story.

There's a lot that doesn't get told in the OT. That doesn't make it a different story at all; it simply makes it a story where not everything is explained. I don't know this for a fact, but I would venture that every movie ever made, as well as every book ever written, every TV show ever put out, and so forth, doesn't tell "the entire story."

I don't know whether or not Lucas had the idea for midichlorians back when he made the OT, nor do I really care, because even if he did and chose not to mention them, it's not a big deal. The OT is set some 20 years after the last PT movie. A lot changed in that time, including Jedi lore and so forth. What would be the point of Obi Wan bringing up midichlorians to Luke, anyway? He already knew Luke had the Force, and just needed to be trained how to use it. Back before the "dark times," there were a lot more potential candidates, so it's likely they needed some formal test to find which ones were worth training. Hence the "midichlorian count."

QUOTE
And I thought the explanation for some people feel the force and some don't, is that the ones who do are trained Jedi or Sith.

From whence did you get this explanation? It appears nowhere in the OT.

QUOTE
They have been their entire life to feel and use the force. With only information from the original trilogy, Han Solo could have learned to feel and use the force too, maybe even at that age, even if only just a little.

Hardly. Luke tells Leia that the Force runs strong in his family in ROTJ. Obviously, the Force can be inherited. If anything, the midichlorians bolster that idea, and explain why not everyone can feel/use the Force, even if it surrounds all living creatures. Besides which, how would the Jedi Council know whom to train as a Jedi if they didn't have some sort of method for finding who was strong with the Force? How would an individual know that he or she was a potential Jedi if he or she didn't feel the Force, even if he or she couldn't control it?

Lucas didn't "ruin" anything with the midichlorians. And I find it ironic that the people who find the midichlorians so intolerable tend to be the same people who have no problem with the EU and its "Force-nullifying" ysalamiri, as well as "Force-aura detecting paddles."


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Zideric
post Mar 30 2010, 10:22 PM
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QUOTE (Leiafan @ Mar 30 2010, 10:43 AM) *
There's a lot that doesn't get told in the OT. That doesn't make it a different story at all; it simply makes it a story where not everything is explained. I don't know this for a fact, but I would venture that every movie ever made, as well as every book ever written, every TV show ever put out, and so forth, doesn't tell "the entire story."

It might not make the story itself different, but it makes the story different as you know it. And nobody might tell the true story, but it still makes it different for the one who's watching or reading.

QUOTE (Leiafan @ Mar 30 2010, 10:43 AM) *
I don't know whether or not Lucas had the idea for midichlorians back when he made the OT, nor do I really care, because even if he did and chose not to mention them, it's not a big deal. The OT is set some 20 years after the last PT movie. A lot changed in that time, including Jedi lore and so forth. What would be the point of Obi Wan bringing up midichlorians to Luke, anyway? He already knew Luke had the Force, and just needed to be trained how to use it. Back before the "dark times," there were a lot more potential candidates, so it's likely they needed some formal test to find which ones were worth training. Hence the "midichlorian count."

Sure a lot changed, but not the force. And not midichlorians. And I know it would be useless to test Luke for midichlorians or something, but maybe Obi-Wan could at least have mentioned midichlorians somewhere in the movie. Luke was full of questions, he didn't know much about the force and all.

"And I thought the explanation for some people feel the force and some don't, is that the ones who do are trained Jedi or Sith."
QUOTE (Leiafan @ Mar 30 2010, 10:43 AM) *
From whence did you get this explanation? It appears nowhere in the OT.

Well that seemed quite obvious. The only ones who know or use the force are Jedi. Others hardly know about it. It seemed like a sort of religion or training or something. And you hardly see anyone in the movies who had a high midichlorian count, but is not a jedi. There are just people who don't feel the force, and people who do: Jedi and Sith.

I already said I agree with midichlorians as a good explanation for many things. I only still think the force in the OT is different from the force in the PT.


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Leiafan
post Apr 1 2010, 06:24 AM
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QUOTE (Zideric @ Mar 30 2010, 10:22 PM) *
It might not make the story itself different, but it makes the story different as you know it. And nobody might tell the true story, but it still makes it different for the one who's watching or reading.

SW has been changing since the first movie came out, both internally and externally. People's perceptions of the movies, either individually or as a whole, change. No two people are going to perceive a movie or a series of movies exactly the same way.

Midichlorians made the story different in this way for me: it showed me that the Force is measurable, like light or heat, and a midichlorian count is, or was, the way to measure it. It didn't change the Force itself.

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Sure a lot changed, but not the force. And not midichlorians. And I know it would be useless to test Luke for midichlorians or something, but maybe Obi-Wan could at least have mentioned midichlorians somewhere in the movie. Luke was full of questions, he didn't know much about the force and all.

He didn't know much about his father either, and there was a whole heck of a lot that Obi Wan didn't tell him about that. In fact, Obi Wan lied to him about that. Why would Obi Wan mention midichlorians? What would be the point? It was a testing method used "before the dark times."

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Well that seemed quite obvious. The only ones who know or use the force are Jedi.

Not at all. There are padawans, who aren't actually Jedi yet, and it stands to reason that there are some people/creatures who feel the Force, but aren't strong enough in it to be trained to be a Jedi. It's like a talent -- some people have more talent (whatever that talent may be) than others.

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Others hardly know about it. It seemed like a sort of religion or training or something. And you hardly see anyone in the movies who had a high midichlorian count, but is not a jedi. There are just people who don't feel the force, and people who do: Jedi and Sith.

Okay...I'm not sure what you're saying here.

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I already said I agree with midichlorians as a good explanation for many things. I only still think the force in the OT is different from the force in the PT.

Well, yes, I suppose it is, in that we now know it's measurable and the method for measuring it.


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Switch
post Apr 2 2010, 06:36 PM
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I can see where the discrepancies lie, and I thought maybe I'd add my two cents. And let me preface this in that I really have no opinion one way or the other as far as midichlorians go.

I can agree that the only things that midichlorians change is the "feel" that the audience had for what the force was. Originally Jedi, and the use of the force in the OT was referred to as religion, it was more mystic, and people who used it seemed to be "called" to it, much like people today are called to serve in religious offices, or may feel compelled that they have a significant talent to help with a natural disaster, or what have you.

Midichlorians don't necessarily change the way the force is used, but changes how it is perceived, it now makes it more scientific rather than mystical and religious. It's kind of like taking a medicine man from a tribe who burns a plant or herb and has some extra clarity of thought that leads him to make more accurate decisions, and then someone comes along and says, "oh, this plant, when burned, releases this chemical, which causes that clarity of mind to happen." The plant is still going to do what it always does when burned, but the "magic" isn't quite there as it used to be. You'd have to look at it from a higher level maybe to restore the mysticism, of yeah, ok, it has that chemical, but why? (If you want to make something mysterious, just keep asking why, typically I find I run out of answers).

Just my opinion. I'm sure some of the reasons people don't like midichlorians is because they feel more regulated, or boxed in, maybe like a handicap. People like feeling that all things are possible, and midichlorians kind of shut the door on that, like saying a blind person can't drive. That person may be proficient in so many things but because of that handicap, they'll never really be allowed to operate a motor vehicle in traffic with the rest of society.

Just opinions and/or ideas that came to mind to try and explain maybe where some of these different attitudes come from. I don't think anyone is wrong, no it doesn't change how the force works, but yes, it does kind of change the way the force feels from original trilogy to the prequels.

Now, from what I understand, midichlorians are supposed to be a type of bacteria? If that's so, and if it behaves like normal bacteria, how is it genetic? How can a family inherit a bacteria from one to another as a genetic makeup? I guess they could inherit a gene that makes them susceptible to it. I don't know. Just some food for thought.

(Sorry for the post length, it's my first official one, might as well make it count, right? =P)
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Madison_rogue
post Apr 3 2010, 12:27 AM
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QUOTE (Switch @ Apr 2 2010, 12:36 PM) *
Now, from what I understand, midichlorians are supposed to be a type of bacteria? If that's so, and if it behaves like normal bacteria, how is it genetic? How can a family inherit a bacteria from one to another as a genetic makeup? I guess they could inherit a gene that makes them susceptible to it. I don't know. Just some food for thought.

(Sorry for the post length, it's my first official one, might as well make it count, right? =P)


Well, midichlorians are based on mitochondria, which have their own specific DNA sequence, and are passed down to offspring maternally. It's originally theorized that mitochondria were originally symbiotic bacteria which, through the evolutionary process, became permanently part of cellular structure.

Mitochondrial DNA, wikipedia

BTW, welcome to BH! Great first post!


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Switch
post Apr 5 2010, 04:31 PM
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Ah, that makes a lot of sense! Thank you very much for explaining that. I've always had a very vague understanding of what midichlorians are supposed to be, but that clears it up entirely. =)

And thank you for the warm welcome. =D BH seems like a really friendly community. It's pretty much the first forum that I felt comfortable joining and posting at. =)
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Madison_rogue
post Apr 5 2010, 07:07 PM
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QUOTE (Switch @ Apr 5 2010, 10:31 AM) *
Ah, that makes a lot of sense! Thank you very much for explaining that. I've always had a very vague understanding of what midichlorians are supposed to be, but that clears it up entirely. =)

And thank you for the warm welcome. =D BH seems like a really friendly community. It's pretty much the first forum that I felt comfortable joining and posting at. =)


Oh, no problem Switch! Glad I could provide the information for you.

Yes, BH is filled with very friendly and knowledgeable members. We don't always agree, but we're very polite towards each other. I've been here for almost 5 years as a member, and about 3½ years as a mod. It's been a wonderful experience. Glad you found us!

You should introduce yourself in "Start Here" if you haven't all ready. msn_yes.gif

EDIT

I see you have. Good job!


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Jayce76
post Nov 22 2011, 11:56 PM
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I never really looked at Midichlorians as an explination of the Force, simply an aspect of the Cosmic Force. There are actually in the early drafts of the Star Wars scripts.
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